CAMLA (Cambridge Michigan Language Assessments)
Cambridge Michigan Language Assessments is a not-for-profit collaboration between the University of Michigan and the University of Cambridge, is a not-for-profit collaboration between the University of Michigan and the University of Cambridge , two institutions with long and distinguished histories in the field of language assessment, teaching, and research.

The University of Michigan has a rich history of tradition, innovation, and excellence. Established almost 200 years ago, it became a model for American higher education, and one of the nation's leading public universities by the end of the Civil War. Today, more than 41,000 students on the Ann Arbor campus pursue undergraduate and graduate degrees, and U-M alumni continue to distinguish themselves in every field of endeavor in every corner of the world.

CEFR
Cambridge Michigan Language Assessments exams are aligned to the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR), an internationally recognized framework that describes language ability in a scale of levels that ranges from A1 for beginners to C2 for those who have mastered a language.
  • ECCE
  • ECPE
  • MELAB
  • MET
  • YLTE
  • Registration


About ECCE
The Examination for the Certificate of Competency in English (ECCE) is a standardized high-intermediate level English as a foreign language (EFL) examination. You might use an ECCE certificate:
  • As evidence of high-intermediate competence in English for personal, public, educational, and occupational purposes
  • To provide evidence of your level of English to employers
  • When applying for a job or a promotion, or when conducting business with companies worldwide
Level
The ECCE is aimed at the B2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) and is valid for the lifetime of the recipient.

ECCE has four components:
Speaking - 15 minutes
A structured oral interaction occurs between the test taker and the speaking test examiner. The interaction involves a visual prompt (4 stages).


Listening - 30 minutes, two parts
Part 1 (multiple choice) - A short recorded conversation is followed by a question. Answer choices are shown as pictures (30 items).
Part 2 (multiple choice) - Short talks delivered by single speakers on different topics, followed by 4 to 6 questions each (20 items).

Grammar, Vocabulary, Reading - 90 minutes, three parts
Grammar (multiple choice) - An incomplete sentence is followed by a choice of words or phrases to complete it. Only one choice is grammatically correct (35 items).
Vocabulary (multiple choice) - An incomplete sentence is followed by a choice of words or phrases to complete it. Only one word has the correct meaning in that context (35 items).
Reading (multiple choice) - Part 1: A short reading passage is followed by comprehension questions.
Part 2: Two sets of four short texts related to each other by topic are followed by 10 questions each (30 items).

Writing - 30 minutes
The test taker reads a short excerpt from a newspaper article and then writes a letter or essay giving an opinion about a situation or issue (1 task).


Preparation and resources
Preparing for the ECCE
The best preparation for the ECCE is through study and use of the English language. CaMLA is committed to helping you in your preparation efforts. We provide a range of ECCE support materials that you can use to familiarize yourself with the structure and level of the ECCE and to prepare for the exam.

There is no set course, syllabus, or prescribed program of English language study to be taken in preparation for the ECCE. However,
  • General English courses at the high-intermediate or advanced levels will be useful to prepare for the ECCE
  • The test tasks that examinees encounter on the test are similar to what students do in English courses all over the world
  • Many different publishers produce study guides for the ECCE
  • Materials used in preparation for other advanced-level English proficiency tests (ECPE, MELAB, TOEFL, TOEIC) may also be helpful in preparing for the ECCE
  • Practice tests are available through our authorized test centers
Resources
Visit the ECCE resources section for sample tests and practice materials, as well as other information for learners, teachers, test centers, and examiners.


About ECPE
The Examination for the Certificate of Proficiency in English (ECPE) is a standardized English as a foreign language (EFL) examination. It is recognized in several countries as official documentary evidence of advanced proficiency in the English language and can be used for academic and professional purposes. It is accepted by some universities as evidence of proficiency in English if the certificate has been received within the past two years.

Level
The ECPE is aimed at the C2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) and is valid for the lifetime of the recipient.

ECPE has four components:
Speaking - 30 - 35 minutes
Test takers participate in a semistructured, multistage task involving two examinees and two examiners. (1 task).

Writing - 30 minutes
Test takers write an essay based upon one of two topic choices (1 task).

Listening - 30 - 45 minutes, three parts
Part 1 (multiple choice) - A short recorded conversation is accompanied by three printed statements. Test takers choose the statement that conveys the same meaning as what was heard, or that is true based upon the conversation (50 Items).
Part 2 (multiple choice) - A recorded question is accompanied by three printed responses. Test takers choose the appropriate response to the question.
Part 3 (multiple choice) - Three recorded talks, such as those that might be heard on the radio, are each followed by recorded comprehension questions. The questions and the answer choices are printed in the test booklet. Test takers choose the correct answer from the choices.

Grammar, Cloze, Vocabulary, Reading - 30 minutes
Grammar (multiple choice) - An incomplete sentence is followed by a choice of words or phrases to complete it. Only one choice is grammatically correct (40 Items).
Cloze (multiple choice) - Two passages with 10 deletions each are followed by choices of words and phrases to complete the text. Test takers must choose the option that best fills each blank in terms of grammar and meaning (20 Items).
Vocabulary (multiple choice) - An incomplete sentence is followed by a choice of words to complete it. Only one word has the correct meaning in that context (40 Items).
Reading (multiple choice) - Four reading passages are followed by comprehension questions. Test takers choose the correct answer from the printed answer choices (20 Items).

Preparation and resources
Preparing for the ECPE
The best preparation for the ECPE is through study and use of the English language. CaMLA is committed to helping you in your preparation efforts. We provide a range of ECPE support materials that you can use to familiarize yourself with the structure and level of the ECPE and to prepare for the exam.
Resources
Visit the ECPE resources section for sample materials, practice materials, as well as other information for learners, teachers, test centers, and examiners.


About MELAB
The Michigan English Language Assessment Battery (MELAB) evaluates advanced-level English language competence of adult nonnative speakers of English. The MELAB is intended for:
  • Students applying to United States, Canadian, British, and other educational institutions where the language of instruction is English
  • Professionals who need English for work or training purposes
  • Anyone interested in obtaining a general assessment of their English language proficiency for educational or employment opportunities
The MELAB is a secure test battery and is administered only by authorized official examiners. Many educational institutions in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, and other countries accept the MELAB as an alternative to the TOEFL.

MELAB has four components:
Writing - 30 minutes
Test takers write an essay based on one of two topic choices. (1 task).

Listening - 35 - 40 minutes, three parts
Part 1 (multiple choice) - A short recorded question or statement is accompanied by three printed responses. Test takers choose the statement that conveys a reasonable answer or response (18 Items).
Part 2 (multiple choice) - A recorded conversation is accompanied by three printed statements. Test takers choose the statement that means about the same thing as what is heard (22 Items).
Part 3 (multiple choice) - Four recorded interviews, such as those that might be heard on the radio, are each followed by recorded comprehension questions. The questions and answer choices are printed in the test booklet. Test takers choose the correct answer from the choices (20 Items).

Grammar, Cloze, Vocabulary, Reading - 80 minutes
Grammar (multiple choice) - An incomplete sentence is followed by a choice of four words or phrases to complete it. Only one choice is grammatically correct (32 Items).
Cloze (multiple choice) - Two passages with deletions are followed by choices of words and phrases to complete the text. Test takers must choose the word or phrase that best fills the blank in terms of grammar and meaning (24 Items).
Vocabulary (multiple choice) - An incomplete sentence is followed by a choice of four words or phrases to complete it. Test takers must choose the option that best completes the sentence in terms of meaning (31 Items).
Reading (multiple choice) - Four reading passages are followed by comprehension questions. Test takers choose the correct answer from the printed answer choices (23 Items).

Speaking - 15minutes
Test takers engage in a conversation with an examiner.

Preparation and resources
Preparing for the MELAB
The best preparation for the MELAB is through the study and use of the English language. CaMLA is committed to helping you in your preparation efforts. A MELAB sample test is available online that you can use to familiarize yourself with the structure and level of the MELAB and to prepare for the exam.
Resources
Visit the MELAB resources section for a range of materials to help you prepare and familiarize yourself with the test, as well as other information for learners, teachers, test centers, and examiners.


About MET
The Michigan English Test (MET) is an examination for test takers who want to evaluate their general English language proficiency in social, educational, and workplace contexts. Listening recordings and reading passages reflect everyday, authentic interaction in an American-English linguistic environment. An MET Speaking Test is also available.

The MET:
  • emphasizes the communicative use of English
  • is designed to measure proficiency in the basic language skill areas of listening, reading, and language usage (grammar and vocabulary)
  • is offered monthly at test centers around the world
The exact cut scores between adjacent CEFR levels, based on research conducted by CaMLA, are available in Interpreting Scaled Scores in Relation to the Common European Framework Levels (PDF). Selected CEFR performance descriptors illustrate what test takers should be able to do at each level.

Who takes the MET?
The MET is intended for adults and adolescents at or above a secondary level of education who want to measure their general English language proficiency in a variety of linguistic contexts. It can be used for educational purposes, such as when finishing an English language course, or for employment purposes, such as applying for a job or pursuing a promotion that requires an English language qualification. The MET is not an admissions test for students applying to universities and colleges in the United States, Canada, and the United Kingdom (see the MELAB).

MET has four components:
Listening, Reading and Grammar Test
The MET that tests listening, reading, and grammar is a paper-and-pencil test that contains 135 multiple-choice questions in two sections.

Section I: Listening (approximately 45 minutes)
  • 60 questions assessing the ability to understand conversations and talks in social, educational, and workplace contexts
Section II: Reading and Grammar (90 minutes)
  • 25 questions testing a variety of grammar structures
  • 50 reading questions assessing the ability to understand a variety of texts in social, educational, and workplace contexts
  • vocabulary is assessed within the listening and reading sections

Speaking Test

The MET Speaking Test measures an individual’s ability to produce comprehensible speech in response to a range of tasks and topics. It is a structured, one-on-one interaction between examiner and test taker that includes five distinct tasks. The tasks require test takers to convey information about a picture and about themselves, give a supported opinion, and state the advantages and disadvantages of a particular proposal. The five tasks are designed to give test takers the opportunity to speak on a number of different topics.

  • Task 1: The test taker describes a picture.
  • Task 2: The test taker talks about a personal experience on a topic related to what is seen in the picture.
  • Task 3: The test taker gives a personal opinion about a topic related to the picture.
  • Task 4: The test taker is presented with a situation and will have to explain some advantages and disadvantages related to that situation.
  • Task 5: The test taker is asked to give an opinion on a new topic and to try to convince the examiner to agree with the idea.
The MET Speaking Test takes approximately ten minutes to complete. Ratings will take into account the fluency, accuracy, and clarity of speech in addition to the ability to effectively complete each task. The final rating is based on answers to all five parts of the test. A sample speaking prompt is available in the MET Resources section.

Preparation and resources
Preparing for the MET
The MET is a general proficiency exam, which means that it does not follow a specific English language curriculum; special preparatory classes are not required. Any upper-intermediate English language course should be sufficient. We provide a range of MET support materials that you can use to familiarize yourself with the structure and level of the MET and to prepare for the exam.
Resources
Visit the MET resources section for sample tests and practice materials, as well as other information for learners, teachers, test centers, and examiners.


About YLTE
CaMLA Young Learners Tests of English (YLTE) are a fun and motivating way to test the English of young learners in the primary and middle grades. The tests cover all four language skills and are developed by CaMLA in association with Cambridge English.

The tests provide a clear and transparent assessment from Bronze (beginner) through Silver to Gold (early intermediate). The tests are international, focusing on American English. Of primary importance is that the testing experience have a positive impact on children and on their subsequent language learning.

 Download a copy of the YLTE Information Bulletin...

Format of the YLTE
There are three levels of assessment for the CaMLA YLTE: Bronze, Silver, and Gold. All three levels of the speaking tests have similar features such as test formats, test environment, assessment procedures, and the standardization of examiners. The three levels differ in the tasks they ask children to attempt, and the assessment criteria used.

Bronze
Listening
About 20 minutes
4 parts / 20 questions
Reading & Writing
20 minutes
5 parts / 25 questions
Speaking
3-5 minutes
5 parts
Silver
Listening
About 25 minutes
5 parts / 25 questions
Reading & Writing
30 minutes
6 parts / 40 questions
Speaking
5-7 minutes
4 parts
Gold
Listening
About 25 minutes
5 parts / 25 questions
Reading & Writing
40 minutes
7 parts / 50 questions
Speaking
7-9 minutes
4 parts

Preparation and resources
Preparing for the YLTE
The best preparation for taking a CaMLA YLTE is through study and use of the English language.
Resources
Visit the YLTE resources section for Bronze, Silver, and Gold sample tests.
Are you a private candidate?
It’s easy to register for CaMLA exams in just three steps:
Step 1 Find an exam date

Use our online search to find an exam date. 

Step 2 Complete the registration form

You can complete the exam registration form online or come to our offices to register for an exam.

Step 3 Make payment

Payment for the exam must be made before the registration deadline.
If you register after the deadline a late fee of 40 Euros will be applied. You can choose to pay for your exam via the following payment methods:

  1. By credit/debit card




  2. By bank transfer to any of the following accounts:
    Banco Santander
    Account holder: Exams Catalunya, S.L.
    Account number: 0049 4754 89 2516056032
    IBAN: ES9400494754892516056032
    Banco Sabadell
    Account holder: Exams Catalunya, S.L.
    Account number: 0081 0053 54 0001180228
    IBAN: ES7300810053540001180228
    IMPORTANT: If you pay for your exam by bank transfer you should clearly state the name and surname/s of the candidate and the level and date of the exam session. All transfers must reach us free of bank charges or interest. Exams Catalunya will not be responsible for these charges. You must send us the payment receipt by email to registrations@exams-catalunya.com so that we may trace your payment with the bank. Your place on the exam will not be confirmed until we receive a payment receipt for the exam fee.

  3. At our offices:
    Registration and payment for exams may also be made at our offices. If candidates choose this option payment should be made on registering. Payment may be made in cash, by bank transfer or credit/debit card.

    C/ Freixa, 5-9
    08021 Barcelona
    Tel: 934 111 333
    Opening hours: Monday to Friday 9am - 5pm

    The candidate may register directly or send someone to register in his/her name.
IMPORTANT: After we receive the exam registration form a confirmation of receipt will be sent to the candidate. Once the exam fees have been settled the candidate will receive confirmation that he/she is registered to take the exam.
If you do not receive confirmation of your exam registration within 3 working days please phone us on tel.: 934 111 333. You should also check that our email has not been sent to your junk/spam mail folder.

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